cocktails

Lommebogen Ground Rules

As I dive into blogging the Lommebogen recipes I need to set some parameters, and clarify a few things. (If you don't know what Lommebogen is, read my earlier blog post about Cocktail History.) Here are some basic things you should know:

The selection of cocktails. I'm not doing every cocktail in Lommebogen (maybe someday, but not now). I'm only doing the cocktails that appear in all three of my reference books: Lommebogen, The Savoy Cocktail Book, and the Café Royal Cocktail Book. That tallies up to 43 cocktails.

Margarita

The lovely number four in our top ten list is the Margarita. Tequila isn't found in so many of the older classic cocktails, and apparently while the Margarita has existed since the 30s (or 40s or 50s, depending on which origin story you roll with), it didn't become well known until the groovy 70s. It's a very simple recipe that is in the same sours class as the Daiquiri and the Sidecar.

Old Fashioned

Ah, the Old Fashioned. I'm so pleased that this came in as number three in my cocktail poll. This drink is much more my style than highballs. The Old Fashioned name came about in the 1880s, but comes from much earlier in the century. Originally in the early 1800s there was a newfangled drink called a "cocktail," which involved adding a little sweetener and some bitters to your shot of liquor. This was the extent of the original definition of a cocktail.

Yellow Daisy Cocktail

This recipe in Lommebogen and Savoy is designed for 6 people, using glasses for measurements, and so I broke it down to one drink size. The only difference in the books is that Café Royal does not include absinthe in its recipe. This looks like a nice riff on a dry martini, with some orange notes and sweetness to round it out.

Yale Cocktail

We've got gin and water, and some things to flavor that. Lommebogen goes big with lemon and orange juice, while the one from Café Royal and Savoy goes simple with some bitters. The Lommebogen one looks more appealing overall, but there isn't any sweetener in here to balance the citrus. That doesn't look so good at all, especially from the book that has been over-sweetening a fair number of drinks. The other recipe just looks like a poor man's gin and tonic.

White Lady Cocktail

This is a classic drink which is basically a gin sour with the sugar swapped for curaçao, so I'm always game for that. Again, Axel is bringing on the sugar though. Equal amounts of cuaçao and sweet and sour (half lemon juice/half sugar) sounds like way to much sugar for a sour drink.

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